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Education

Whether you're looking for ways to minimize waste, ideas on how to recycle smarter or things you can do to help the environment, this section is your educational resource.

Want to become a Master Recycler?

Are you passionate about preventing waste, increasing recycling, conserving natural resources and making a difference right here in our area? If so, you should consider becoming a Jackson County Master Recycler. Our volunteer team of waste prevention ambassadors work within their communities to cultivate public awareness and support a variety of projects and programs related to recycling. As a master recycler, you will share your knowledge and motivate others to make resource conservation a way of life.

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Tackling the Top 4 contaminants!

In order to find markets for commingled recyclable materials, it’s crucial that the materials be as contaminant-free as possible.

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How other communities are rethinking recycling

Over the past two decades, China has become the main international market for processing recyclable materials. Everything from paper and plastics to glass, cardboard and magazines made their way from curbside in the United States (and other countries) to sprawling facilities in China.

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Being compostable doesn’t always mean better for the environment: The trouble with “compostable” packaging and serviceware.

The leaves, grass clippings and yard debris Rogue Disposal & Recycling collects during the year all become a nutritious — and natural — part of Rogue Compost. The quality of our nutrient-rich composts help create healthier and more resilient soil for use in everything from lawns, flower beds and landscaping to orchards, gardens, vineyards and more.

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What happens when recycling efforts work well but recyclable materials no longer have a market?

After years of public-information and educational campaigns, recycling in the United States has become commonplace. Whether you’re at work, the mall, a theme park or city streets, odds are you’ll run across designated drop-off containers for pop cans, water bottles, newspaper and more.

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10 easy ways to cut back on common household disposable items

With recycling markets in flux and the rules for what can and can’t be recycled changing, it’s easy to get discouraged about the amount of stuff you now need to throw away. The good news is that you can choose not to use some of that stuff in the first place — opting instead for reusable items and cutting down on the overall number of everyday items you need to dispose of.

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Limited Plastic Bottle and Jug Recycling: Learn the Full Story

As of October 1, 2018, we added two new materials to the list of items you can drop off at the Transfer Station Recycling Depot.

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Why is recycling as we know it changing?

What do plastic grocery bags, used coffee cups, pizza boxes and Styrofoam have to do with a rapidly changing recycling landscape? They lead the list of things typically found in the recycling cart that can’t, in fact, be recycled.

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Wasted food equals wasted money

Here’s some food for thought: Every year, an estimated 25 to 40 percent of all food produced or imported for consumption in the United States is never eaten. That’s as much as 63 million tons of wasted food. Of that amount, 40% is estimated to come from restaurants, grocery stores and commercial food service providers. And all that wasted food means wasted money — by some estimates as much as $57 billion annually for U.S. businesses.

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Digging in to make your own compost

Simply put, compost is decomposed organic matter that can be used as a fertilizer for plants. Composting is the natural process of recycling organic material — such as dark, crumbly soil-like material that can be used as a mulch, top dressing or soil amendment.

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